How hot spot diagram could make the U.S. even hotter and more toxic to the planet

A new map of global warming and the state of the world’s air pollution is making headlines, but it’s not the only hot spot map.

As the climate changes, the air pollution from burning fossil fuels is also increasing.

That means the heat and pollution from the burning of coal, oil, gas and petroleum will continue to rise.

As a result, the United States is now in the hot spot chart.

The map is a new version of a 2014 map that shows how the nation’s air is polluted from the coal, gas, and oil industry.

The map was created by researchers at the University of Michigan and the University at Buffalo, which both analyzed the data and published the findings.

The researchers say the map is not meant to replace a previous version of the map, which used data from a number of sources to create the graphic.

The data from the original map, they wrote, was “too limited and biased.”

It was not clear from the new map whether the new data would include data from different sources.

The new map is more accurate because it uses data from three sources, according to the researchers.

The scientists used data compiled by the World Bank and the U,T.C.E., a government agency.

The World Bank analyzed air quality in 30 cities, while the U.,T.

Cs.

E. measured pollution from industrial, residential, and other uses.

In addition, they included data from various national and international agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The maps show the amount of pollution that cities get from each source.

The red areas on the map show where the air is considered to be at high risk of pollution.

The darker the area, the higher the risk.

The chart below shows the average amount of pollutants each source contributes to each of the 30 cities.

The blue lines represent the average pollution for each of those 30 cities compared to the United Nations’ air quality guidelines.

The graph below shows how polluted each city is compared to other U.s. cities.

Red dots represent sources that contribute more than 50% of the total amount of air pollution.

Blue dots represent pollution that contributes less than 50%.

The map shows the amount that each source adds to the air.

The green line indicates the U.’s air quality standards, and the darker the line, the greater the risk of air quality.

How hot spot diagram could make the U.S. even hotter and more toxic to the planet

A new map of global warming and the state of the world’s air pollution is making headlines, but it’s not the only hot spot map.

As the climate changes, the air pollution from burning fossil fuels is also increasing.

That means the heat and pollution from the burning of coal, oil, gas and petroleum will continue to rise.

As a result, the United States is now in the hot spot chart.

The map is a new version of a 2014 map that shows how the nation’s air is polluted from the coal, gas, and oil industry.

The map was created by researchers at the University of Michigan and the University at Buffalo, which both analyzed the data and published the findings.

The researchers say the map is not meant to replace a previous version of the map, which used data from a number of sources to create the graphic.

The data from the original map, they wrote, was “too limited and biased.”

It was not clear from the new map whether the new data would include data from different sources.

The new map is more accurate because it uses data from three sources, according to the researchers.

The scientists used data compiled by the World Bank and the U,T.C.E., a government agency.

The World Bank analyzed air quality in 30 cities, while the U.,T.

Cs.

E. measured pollution from industrial, residential, and other uses.

In addition, they included data from various national and international agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The maps show the amount of pollution that cities get from each source.

The red areas on the map show where the air is considered to be at high risk of pollution.

The darker the area, the higher the risk.

The chart below shows the average amount of pollutants each source contributes to each of the 30 cities.

The blue lines represent the average pollution for each of those 30 cities compared to the United Nations’ air quality guidelines.

The graph below shows how polluted each city is compared to other U.s. cities.

Red dots represent sources that contribute more than 50% of the total amount of air pollution.

Blue dots represent pollution that contributes less than 50%.

The map shows the amount that each source adds to the air.

The green line indicates the U.’s air quality standards, and the darker the line, the greater the risk of air quality.